7-day laptop loans, lab manuals and Dprint

You wrote:

Please implement the 7-day laptop loan. It is high time. Please also make lab manuals available for more that 3 hours. Our lab sessions are 4 hours long so what is the point of loaning it for 3 hours (if you want to photocopy it, that takes 10 min, of course if the INFAMOUS D-print system happens to be working, if not it might take you 3 hours…). Why did you outsource the printing service? Yes, the system had to be updated but did it have to be outsourced? Did students, for whom this whole library construct is put into place, even have a say in this?

On March 19, the Vanier Library introduced 7-day loans on ten laptops.  For now, the libraries do not have enough laptops to expand this service.

As for extending the loan period for “lab manuals”, it is the first time that anyone has brought up this concern.  I have forwarded your request to Circulation Services.

Regarding Dprint; Dprint is managed by the University. It is not outsourced. Photocopying has always fallen under the jurisdiction of the University. Since modern photocopiers can scan, print and email, the University decided to keep all printing functions under one umbrella.  Most people would agree that having one universal system across the University is preferable to having two concurrent printing systems.

Thank you for your comments.

2 thoughts on “7-day laptop loans, lab manuals and Dprint

  1. Anonymous

    “Most people would agree that having one universal system across the University is preferable to having two concurrent printing systems.”

    Isn’t “most people” just a catch phrase for “we decide, you abide”? You might want to remove that sentence, it is rude to students who are not rude, and are the unconsulted users of this system.

    There is a big difference between the use that staff will make of the system and the use the students will make of the equipment.

    Networked-Multifunction machines are only superior if they NEVER break down. Otherwise, instead of having one printer or copier down, you lose the whole system.

  2. Anonymous

    Machines can’t be expected to never break down. They are human built, and the way people print everything now that electronic access to readings is more prevalent, they are bound to break down. So many electronic devices but we are still paper bound.

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